Drinking orange juice daily ‘cuts dementia risk by almost 50 per cent’

Middle-aged men who drink orange juice daily may be lowering their chances of cognitive decline, according to a new study published in the journal Neurology.

The research involved almost 28,000 men whose diets were tracked for two decades, starting when they were 51 years old.

Based on the results of cognition tests carried out every four years, the researchers also found that by their later 70s, men who had regularly eaten the most vegetables over the previous decades were 17 per cent less likely to have moderate cognitive problems and 34 per cent less likely to have ‘extensive’ cognitive issues.

Only 6.9 of people who drank orange juice daily went on to have poor cognitive function. The figure is 8.4 per cent in men who drank orange juice less than once a month.

The study’s lead author, Changzheng Yuan, said: ‘The protective role of regular consumption of fruit juice was mainly observed among the oldest men. Since fruit juice is usually high in calories from concentrated fruit sugars, it’s generally best to consume no more than a small glass (four to six ounces) per day.’

‘Fruit and vegetable consumption may be a piece of the puzzle to maintaining cognitive health and should be viewed in conjunction with other behaviours believed to support cognitive health.’